The Cville People Project is a documentary photography project, the goal of which is to depict the city of Charlottesville through its inhabitants. I intend to make portraits of as many Charlottesvillians as possible and share them, along with a little bit about each person, on this photoblog.

Feel free to contact me at cville.people@gmail.com if you would like to be part of the project or know someone who would. The Cville People Project also has a Facebook page.

To see more of my photography, take a look at my website, my Facebook page, or my Flickr photostream.

You can also follow me on Instagram (K_A_Sprouse) or Twitter (@K_A_Sprouse).

13th April 2014

Photo with 1 note

Street portrait: Ashley, the Unitea Party activist
Now that the weather is nice, I’m once again out photographing people around Charlottesville as part of my Cville People Project.  Walking through the Charlottesville City Market yesterday, I came across this young woman, and when I saw that she was wearing a tea cup on her head, I had to stop to talk to her. 
Ashley is a Charlottesville native, and she graduated from the University of Virginia with a degree in English.  She was at the City Market to drum up some publicity for a bowl-a-thon taking place in Richmond next week sponsored by the Richmond Reproductive Freedom Project, which has as its mission to “support access to a range of reproductive choices.”  As Ashley told me, the goal of the group and of the fundraiser is to “give women options,” ranging from contraceptives to access to abortions, because she believes that “every woman deserves the opportunity to shape her own life.” 
If you’d like to learn more about the bowl-a-thon or contribute to her fundraising activities, you can check out her page here. 
Please consider checking out my Facebook page or my website to see more of my photography.

Street portrait: Ashley, the Unitea Party activist

Now that the weather is nice, I’m once again out photographing people around Charlottesville as part of my Cville People Project.  Walking through the Charlottesville City Market yesterday, I came across this young woman, and when I saw that she was wearing a tea cup on her head, I had to stop to talk to her. 

Ashley is a Charlottesville native, and she graduated from the University of Virginia with a degree in English.  She was at the City Market to drum up some publicity for a bowl-a-thon taking place in Richmond next week sponsored by the Richmond Reproductive Freedom Project, which has as its mission to “support access to a range of reproductive choices.”  As Ashley told me, the goal of the group and of the fundraiser is to “give women options,” ranging from contraceptives to access to abortions, because she believes that “every woman deserves the opportunity to shape her own life.” 

If you’d like to learn more about the bowl-a-thon or contribute to her fundraising activities, you can check out her page here

Please consider checking out my Facebook page or my website to see more of my photography.

Tagged: Cville People Projectcvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraits100 strangersKeith Alan Sprouse

4th August 2013

Photo with 12 notes



Kay, the book lady
As a mental health and substance abuse clinician working in a community clinic, a certain percentage of my clients have been incarcerated at some point in their lives. A while back, one of my clients told me about Books Behind Bars, a non-profit organization that sends books to people in jails and prisons around the country for free. I had never heard of Books Behind Bars before, but I could see immediately what a wonderful gift it must be for those who are incarcerated in institutions that often have very little access to books, and I decided to contact Kay to learn more about the program.
Kay started the Quest Bookshop almost thirty-five years ago. It’s one of the few independent bookstores left in town, and it’s located on West Main St. About twenty years ago, she started sending books to inmates who requested them, and she’s been doing so ever since. Kay told me that she receives about twenty-five letters a day asking for everything from dictionaries and books on home repair to mystery novels and classic literary works. As a non-profit organization, they function on donations, and during the school year, a number of UVA students help fill the orders.When I asked her why she does what she does, her answer was simple: “How would we feel,” she replied, “if we didn’t have any books to read?” From looking over some of the many thank-you letters she receives from book recipients, it’s clear just how important her work is. You can read excepts from some of the letters sent by grateful inmates here.
Many community members have donated books or money to keep Books Behind Bars in operation, including John Grisham and Coran Capshaw. I encourage you to consider going to the Books Behind Bars website and making a donation yourself.
West Main Street in Charlottesville, VA

Kay, the book lady

As a mental health and substance abuse clinician working in a community clinic, a certain percentage of my clients have been incarcerated at some point in their lives. A while back, one of my clients told me about Books Behind Bars, a non-profit organization that sends books to people in jails and prisons around the country for free. I had never heard of Books Behind Bars before, but I could see immediately what a wonderful gift it must be for those who are incarcerated in institutions that often have very little access to books, and I decided to contact Kay to learn more about the program.

Kay started the Quest Bookshop almost thirty-five years ago. It’s one of the few independent bookstores left in town, and it’s located on West Main St. About twenty years ago, she started sending books to inmates who requested them, and she’s been doing so ever since. Kay told me that she receives about twenty-five letters a day asking for everything from dictionaries and books on home repair to mystery novels and classic literary works. As a non-profit organization, they function on donations, and during the school year, a number of UVA students help fill the orders.

When I asked her why she does what she does, her answer was simple: “How would we feel,” she replied, “if we didn’t have any books to read?” From looking over some of the many thank-you letters she receives from book recipients, it’s clear just how important her work is. You can read excepts from some of the letters sent by grateful inmates here.

Many community members have donated books or money to keep Books Behind Bars in operation, including John Grisham and Coran Capshaw. I encourage you to consider going to the Books Behind Bars website and making a donation yourself.

West Main Street in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraitsbooks behind barsquest bookshop

28th July 2013

Photo with 7 notes



Elaura, the public historian
While walking down to the Free Speech Wall the other day to see if any there was any new chalk art, I was stopped by Elaura, who asked if I had a couple of free minutes to answer a couple of questions about Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s home. Since I moved to Charlottesville almost twenty years ago, I’ve been to Monticello a few times, often accompanying out-of-town visitors. After completing her survey, I asked her if she would be willing to participate in my project, and she was kind enough to agree.
Elaura is an intern at Monticello, and three days a week she gives guided tours of Mr. Jefferson’s house; she spends the rest of her time participating in Monticello’s publicity efforts, focusing most recently on trying to improve its image as a family-friendly tourist destination. Elaura is half-way through a master’s degree in public history at Middle Tennessee State, and she’ll graduate next May. She told me that this internship is a “dream job” for her, as she has a true passion for history and for educating people about it. “History connects us to the past,” she said, “and it also connects us to ourselves.” She really enjoys leading tours of the house, and serving as a guide has taught her a lot about storytelling: history is, among other things, a collection stories that we tell about the past, and she works hard to find ways to tell stories that engage the visitors to Monticello on her tours.
As I was leaving, I asked about her name. After all, Elaura isn’t particularly common. She told me that her parents named her after the character Princess Elaura in the movie Willow, which I’ve never seen.
Elaura has only two weeks left in her internship, so she may not be there the next time you make the pilgrimage to Monticello. If you do happen to make it out there and have her as your tour guide, make sure to tell her that I said hi!
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Elaura, the public historian

While walking down to the Free Speech Wall the other day to see if any there was any new chalk art, I was stopped by Elaura, who asked if I had a couple of free minutes to answer a couple of questions about Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s home. Since I moved to Charlottesville almost twenty years ago, I’ve been to Monticello a few times, often accompanying out-of-town visitors. After completing her survey, I asked her if she would be willing to participate in my project, and she was kind enough to agree.

Elaura is an intern at Monticello, and three days a week she gives guided tours of Mr. Jefferson’s house; she spends the rest of her time participating in Monticello’s publicity efforts, focusing most recently on trying to improve its image as a family-friendly tourist destination. Elaura is half-way through a master’s degree in public history at Middle Tennessee State, and she’ll graduate next May. She told me that this internship is a “dream job” for her, as she has a true passion for history and for educating people about it. “History connects us to the past,” she said, “and it also connects us to ourselves.” She really enjoys leading tours of the house, and serving as a guide has taught her a lot about storytelling: history is, among other things, a collection stories that we tell about the past, and she works hard to find ways to tell stories that engage the visitors to Monticello on her tours.

As I was leaving, I asked about her name. After all, Elaura isn’t particularly common. She told me that her parents named her after the character Princess Elaura in the movie Willow, which I’ve never seen.

Elaura has only two weeks left in her internship, so she may not be there the next time you make the pilgrimage to Monticello. If you do happen to make it out there and have her as your tour guide, make sure to tell her that I said hi!

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraits

28th July 2013

Photo with 6 notes



Natalie, a woman of strength
I mentioned in a post recently that it is exceeding rare that I receive an email suggesting that I photograph someone for my project, so you can imagine my surprise when I found a message from Natalie in my inbox. She wrote to tell me that she was finishing treatment for breast cancer and wanted to commemorate it with a portrait, and I was both pleased and touched that she had reached out to me. We met up shortly thereafter and made this portrait.
Charlottesville is a small town, and Natalie is a photographer, so our paths have crossed before, but this was the first time that I’ve had a chance to have a real conversation with her. She’s a nurse by profession, and she’s the last person you might expect to come down with breast cancer. She leads a quite healthy lifestyle: she eats a well-balanced diet, she gets lots of exercise because she’s a runner, and she has no family history of breast cancer. Nonetheless, while performing a routine self-examination in January, she found a lump, and when she went to get it checked by a physician, they determined that it was cancerous. She immediately began her treatment, which included surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, and her prognosis is good. She is currently cancer-free, but she’ll continue to take medication for years to come and undergo routine check-ups to make sure that it doesn’t come back.
Natalie told me that it was a strange experience being a patient after spending so many years as a health-care provider. She learned just how important it is for patients to be active and involved in their treatment decisions, asking lots of questions, making sure that they understand the benefits and drawbacks of various treatment options, and expressing their preferences.
Natalie usually participates in the annual Charlottesville Womens’ Four Miler, a charity race that benefits the UVa Breast Care Program. The proceeds from the race support cutting edge breast cancer research, patient education, support services, and community outreach in the Charlottesville area; in other words, the funds raised stay local. Natalie told me that she is looking forward to running this year, as the race will have a very personal meaning to her.
I encourage you to consider donating to this extremely worthy charity, and you can do so here. If you decide to make a donation, please consider sponsoring Natalie Krovetz, who was kind enough to participate in my project and share her story with us.
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Natalie, a woman of strength

I mentioned in a post recently that it is exceeding rare that I receive an email suggesting that I photograph someone for my project, so you can imagine my surprise when I found a message from Natalie in my inbox. She wrote to tell me that she was finishing treatment for breast cancer and wanted to commemorate it with a portrait, and I was both pleased and touched that she had reached out to me. We met up shortly thereafter and made this portrait.

Charlottesville is a small town, and Natalie is a photographer, so our paths have crossed before, but this was the first time that I’ve had a chance to have a real conversation with her. She’s a nurse by profession, and she’s the last person you might expect to come down with breast cancer. She leads a quite healthy lifestyle: she eats a well-balanced diet, she gets lots of exercise because she’s a runner, and she has no family history of breast cancer. Nonetheless, while performing a routine self-examination in January, she found a lump, and when she went to get it checked by a physician, they determined that it was cancerous. She immediately began her treatment, which included surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, and her prognosis is good. She is currently cancer-free, but she’ll continue to take medication for years to come and undergo routine check-ups to make sure that it doesn’t come back.

Natalie told me that it was a strange experience being a patient after spending so many years as a health-care provider. She learned just how important it is for patients to be active and involved in their treatment decisions, asking lots of questions, making sure that they understand the benefits and drawbacks of various treatment options, and expressing their preferences.

Natalie usually participates in the annual Charlottesville Womens’ Four Miler, a charity race that benefits the UVa Breast Care Program. The proceeds from the race support cutting edge breast cancer research, patient education, support services, and community outreach in the Charlottesville area; in other words, the funds raised stay local. Natalie told me that she is looking forward to running this year, as the race will have a very personal meaning to her.

I encourage you to consider donating to this extremely worthy charity, and you can do so here. If you decide to make a donation, please consider sponsoring Natalie Krovetz, who was kind enough to participate in my project and share her story with us.

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraits

14th July 2013

Photo with 5 notes



David, the photographer
As someone interested in photography, one of the best times of the year to live in Charlottesville is in June, when the Look3 Festival of the Photograph comes to town. Every year, some of the best photographers in the world come to town, showing their work in numerous galleries and giving talks about their works to appreciative audiences. The local bars, restaurants, and cafes fill up with aspiring young photographers who participate in portfolio reviews and network, and photography fans who soak up the atmosphere and thank their lucky stars that such a wonderful event takes place in our town.
I had decided to try to include a well-known photographer in my project, since Look3 occupies such an important place on the arts calendar, but I was also a bit apprehensive, as the idea of approaching one of my photographic heroes to ask them to pose for a portrait was rather daunting. On the first day of the festival, though, I gathered my courage and went up to one of my favorite photographers, David Alan Harvey, and asked him to participate. After pausing for a moment to think about it, he agreed and walked with me across the Downtown Mall for a portrait.
Under normal circumstances, I spend some time with my subjects, asking them who they are, what they do, and so on, but in this case, I already had the answers to all of these questions, so I made a few frames and let him get back to enjoying the festival. If you like photography, I encourage you to check out his website and the website for burn magazine to learn more about him and to see some of his work.
For my part, I was grateful that David was kind enough to participate in my project. I have no doubt that I’m not the only one who asked for a few moments of his time during the festival, and it says a lot of good things about him that he was generous enough to indulge me.
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

David, the photographer

As someone interested in photography, one of the best times of the year to live in Charlottesville is in June, when the Look3 Festival of the Photograph comes to town. Every year, some of the best photographers in the world come to town, showing their work in numerous galleries and giving talks about their works to appreciative audiences. The local bars, restaurants, and cafes fill up with aspiring young photographers who participate in portfolio reviews and network, and photography fans who soak up the atmosphere and thank their lucky stars that such a wonderful event takes place in our town.

I had decided to try to include a well-known photographer in my project, since Look3 occupies such an important place on the arts calendar, but I was also a bit apprehensive, as the idea of approaching one of my photographic heroes to ask them to pose for a portrait was rather daunting. On the first day of the festival, though, I gathered my courage and went up to one of my favorite photographers, David Alan Harvey, and asked him to participate. After pausing for a moment to think about it, he agreed and walked with me across the Downtown Mall for a portrait.

Under normal circumstances, I spend some time with my subjects, asking them who they are, what they do, and so on, but in this case, I already had the answers to all of these questions, so I made a few frames and let him get back to enjoying the festival. If you like photography, I encourage you to check out his website and the website for burn magazine to learn more about him and to see some of his work.

For my part, I was grateful that David was kind enough to participate in my project. I have no doubt that I’m not the only one who asked for a few moments of his time during the festival, and it says a lot of good things about him that he was generous enough to indulge me.

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvillelook3look3festivalportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraitsdavid alan harvey

14th July 2013

Photo with 5 notes



Maureen, the networker
If you are active in the Charlottesville art scene, you will have heard something about the New City Arts Initiative, an organization that works through partnerships to create a creative network in the community. As the executive director, Maureen is a sort of networker-in-chief, bringing people together in a variety of initiatives, including educational events, artist residencies, performance opportunities, and fund-raising. She told me that her goal is to foster a creative community, with the expectation that through the strengthening of that community, the city itself can be transformed.
Maureen is an artist herself, having studied printmaking at the University of Virginia. After spending a year in New York after graduation, she moved back to Charlottesville in 2010. At that time, there was a loose coalition of folks working to establish a more permanent organization, and she made a bold proposal to them: if I can raise enough money to fund the organization, she told them, you will hire me to be the organization’s executive director. The rest, as they say, is history.
When I talk to people about their jobs, one of the things I often ask them is to share with me what they like and don’t like about their work. Maureen had a ready answer to the first half of that question: she told me that she loves connecting with the various community members with whom she works. As for the downside of her job, she was unable to cite even one. No wonder she’s so good at what she does!
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Maureen, the networker

If you are active in the Charlottesville art scene, you will have heard something about the New City Arts Initiative, an organization that works through partnerships to create a creative network in the community. As the executive director, Maureen is a sort of networker-in-chief, bringing people together in a variety of initiatives, including educational events, artist residencies, performance opportunities, and fund-raising. She told me that her goal is to foster a creative community, with the expectation that through the strengthening of that community, the city itself can be transformed.

Maureen is an artist herself, having studied printmaking at the University of Virginia. After spending a year in New York after graduation, she moved back to Charlottesville in 2010. At that time, there was a loose coalition of folks working to establish a more permanent organization, and she made a bold proposal to them: if I can raise enough money to fund the organization, she told them, you will hire me to be the organization’s executive director. The rest, as they say, is history.

When I talk to people about their jobs, one of the things I often ask them is to share with me what they like and don’t like about their work. Maureen had a ready answer to the first half of that question: she told me that she loves connecting with the various community members with whom she works. As for the downside of her job, she was unable to cite even one. No wonder she’s so good at what she does!

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraitsnew city arts initiativephotographers on tumblr

14th July 2013

Photo with 5 notes



Sam, the music man
One of the more curious cultural venues in Charlottesville is a place called The Garage, which is, as the name suggests, a garage. My first experience with the Garage happened last summer, as I was walking through tiny Lee Park. I saw a bunch of folks sitting on the hill and realized that they were watching a band play in a garage across the street. Since then, I’ve seen some bands and have been to a couple of art shows there, most recently Susan Meiselas’ 160 Actions to Make a Jacket during the Look3 photo festival.
Sam is the curator and is a co-founder of the Garage, which got its start back in 2008, when Christ Episcopal Church decided to make a gift to the community. The church provided the funding, and Sam and Kate Daughdrill, who was an artist-in-residence there, teamed up to turn the garage behind the church into a performance venue. Since that time, bands from all around the country have played there, and they have hosted art works by photographers, painters, graphic artists and others. And all of the shows are free to the public.
Although Sam is the church’s music minister, and funding for the Garage comes from the church, one of the church’s goals when they founded the Garage was that it be independent from the church, so the church plays no role in the day-to-day affairs of the venue. As Sam explained, the church’s attitude is that a true gift comes with no strings.
Sam isn’t just a curator, though. He’s also an accomplished musician in his own right, and he’s part of a band called The Hill and Wood.
You can keep up with the latest happenings at the Garage by “liking” them on Facebook, and you can follow Sam’s band by stopping by their Facebook page here
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Sam, the music man

One of the more curious cultural venues in Charlottesville is a place called The Garage, which is, as the name suggests, a garage. My first experience with the Garage happened last summer, as I was walking through tiny Lee Park. I saw a bunch of folks sitting on the hill and realized that they were watching a band play in a garage across the street. Since then, I’ve seen some bands and have been to a couple of art shows there, most recently Susan Meiselas’ 160 Actions to Make a Jacket during the Look3 photo festival.

Sam is the curator and is a co-founder of the Garage, which got its start back in 2008, when Christ Episcopal Church decided to make a gift to the community. The church provided the funding, and Sam and Kate Daughdrill, who was an artist-in-residence there, teamed up to turn the garage behind the church into a performance venue. Since that time, bands from all around the country have played there, and they have hosted art works by photographers, painters, graphic artists and others. And all of the shows are free to the public.

Although Sam is the church’s music minister, and funding for the Garage comes from the church, one of the church’s goals when they founded the Garage was that it be independent from the church, so the church plays no role in the day-to-day affairs of the venue. As Sam explained, the church’s attitude is that a true gift comes with no strings.

Sam isn’t just a curator, though. He’s also an accomplished musician in his own right, and he’s part of a band called The Hill and Wood.

You can keep up with the latest happenings at the Garage by “liking” them on Facebook, and you can follow Sam’s band by stopping by their Facebook page here

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraitsthe garage

14th July 2013

Photo with 7 notes



Desi, the Northerner
On the upper left-hand side of the Cville People Project blog, there is an email address where people who would like to participate in the project can contact me. Thus far, only two people have done so. I wrote back to the first person, but he must not have been that interested, since he didn’t respond. Desi is the second person, and as you can see, it worked out just fine.
Desi works in the music management industry, currently in the marketing department at the John Paul Jones Arena. She told me that she loves her job but would like to move over to the event side at some point. Desi said that she is often managing the box office at shows, and she finds it rewarding to see thousands of people enjoying the shows at the JPJ. Of the shows she’s seen recently, Desi cited Straight No Chaser, an a cappella group, as one of her favorites. When I asked her what her dream job would be, she said that she’d like to be a tour manager for someone like Lady Gaga, which does sound like it would be quite an experience.
Desi is originally from Michigan, and she’s lived in the South for less than a year. We talked about how different Virginia is from the Midwest, and she shared that some of folks she works with tease her about being a Northerner. One co-worker specifically kids her about smiling all the time, definitely a Midwestern trait, but when you have a smile as warm and friendly as hers, it would be a shame not to share it.
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Desi, the Northerner

On the upper left-hand side of the Cville People Project blog, there is an email address where people who would like to participate in the project can contact me. Thus far, only two people have done so. I wrote back to the first person, but he must not have been that interested, since he didn’t respond. Desi is the second person, and as you can see, it worked out just fine.

Desi works in the music management industry, currently in the marketing department at the John Paul Jones Arena. She told me that she loves her job but would like to move over to the event side at some point. Desi said that she is often managing the box office at shows, and she finds it rewarding to see thousands of people enjoying the shows at the JPJ. Of the shows she’s seen recently, Desi cited Straight No Chaser, an a cappella group, as one of her favorites. When I asked her what her dream job would be, she said that she’d like to be a tour manager for someone like Lady Gaga, which does sound like it would be quite an experience.

Desi is originally from Michigan, and she’s lived in the South for less than a year. We talked about how different Virginia is from the Midwest, and she shared that some of folks she works with tease her about being a Northerner. One co-worker specifically kids her about smiling all the time, definitely a Midwestern trait, but when you have a smile as warm and friendly as hers, it would be a shame not to share it.

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraitsphotographers on tumblr

14th July 2013

Photo with 5 notes



Garald, the minstrel
There are always street musicians out performing on the Downtown Mall, even when the weather fails to cooperate. Among the more unexpected acts I’ve seen recently was a Renaissance-era minstrel with a lute, sporting a period costume and alternating between singing and reciting Shakespearean verse.
Gerald, the founder of an ensemble called The Good Pennyworths, was visiting the Charlottesville area with his wife and daughter and decided to take advantage of the opportunity to ply his trade while his wife was in a workshop. He told me that he is from Ohio but has lived in NYC for the better part of forty years now. Garald studied music at a conservatory in Ohio and completed a master’s in music education, and his passion for the music of the Renaissance was clearly evident, as he gave me a brief introduction to the subject while I photographed him. He has shared his knowledge and his talents at festivals and concerts throughout the U.S. and around the world, and he is currently an officer in the Lute Society of America.
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Garald, the minstrel

There are always street musicians out performing on the Downtown Mall, even when the weather fails to cooperate. Among the more unexpected acts I’ve seen recently was a Renaissance-era minstrel with a lute, sporting a period costume and alternating between singing and reciting Shakespearean verse.

Gerald, the founder of an ensemble called The Good Pennyworths, was visiting the Charlottesville area with his wife and daughter and decided to take advantage of the opportunity to ply his trade while his wife was in a workshop. He told me that he is from Ohio but has lived in NYC for the better part of forty years now.

Garald studied music at a conservatory in Ohio and completed a master’s in music education, and his passion for the music of the Renaissance was clearly evident, as he gave me a brief introduction to the subject while I photographed him. He has shared his knowledge and his talents at festivals and concerts throughout the U.S. and around the world, and he is currently an officer in the Lute Society of America.

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Tagged: Cville People Project100 strangerscvillecharlottesvilleportraitportraitsstreet portraitstreet portraits

14th July 2013

Photo with 9 notes



Maya, the polyglot
One of the basic rules that I set for the Cville People Project was that I wouldn’t photograph children, for a few different reasons. First off, even if one’s intentions are pure, in our society there’s something potentially worrying about a middle-aged man going up to a child and asking to take a photo. Secondly, one of my other rules is that I don’t photograph people who are impaired in any way, either because they are intoxicated or mentally unstable or in some other way incapable of legally consenting to participate in my project, and children are legally unable to consent.
When I saw a news story on NBC 29 about a 12-year-old who was working on an iPad app to teach children foreign languages, I decided to make an exception. I emailed her parents, explaining my project and asking if they would allow their daughter to participate, if she was interested. Her mother wrote back to say that they approved, and I met Maya and her mother a few days later.
Maya and her parents — a French teacher and a computer scientist — are using bilingual fables to teach children foreign languages; when I say bilingual fables, I mean that each fable will be in two languages, English and one other language, without any definitions provided, but written in such a way that the meaning will be clear from the context. Maya told me that users will be able to select from seven languages:French, Spanish, Chinese, Hindi, Arabic, Vietnamese and another language voted on by individuals who contributed to their Kickstarter campaign. Each fable will have both the written text and audio of native speakers performing it, so that users will be able to match the words with the pronunciation.
Maye was excited to report that they were close to meeting their goal of $3,500 on Kickstarter, and they actually ended up surpassing it. The app will be free, and the funds they raised will enable them to hire people who speak the languages that Maya and her parents don’t. She is bilingual in French and English, her mother is French, and her father speaks both French and Vietnamese. Since Charlottesville is a university town with a larger international population than one might expect, Maya and her mother were fairly optimistic about finding representatives of the other languages they want to include.
When I asked Maya about her interest in languages, she told me that she loves learning about different cultures and sees language as a great point of entry. As a former foreign language teacher myself, I know exactly what she means.
You can learn more about Maya’s app, as well as an app that her mother’s students created, here.
Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

Maya, the polyglot

One of the basic rules that I set for the Cville People Project was that I wouldn’t photograph children, for a few different reasons. First off, even if one’s intentions are pure, in our society there’s something potentially worrying about a middle-aged man going up to a child and asking to take a photo. Secondly, one of my other rules is that I don’t photograph people who are impaired in any way, either because they are intoxicated or mentally unstable or in some other way incapable of legally consenting to participate in my project, and children are legally unable to consent.

When I saw a news story on NBC 29 about a 12-year-old who was working on an iPad app to teach children foreign languages, I decided to make an exception. I emailed her parents, explaining my project and asking if they would allow their daughter to participate, if she was interested. Her mother wrote back to say that they approved, and I met Maya and her mother a few days later.

Maya and her parents — a French teacher and a computer scientist — are using bilingual fables to teach children foreign languages; when I say bilingual fables, I mean that each fable will be in two languages, English and one other language, without any definitions provided, but written in such a way that the meaning will be clear from the context. Maya told me that users will be able to select from seven languages:French, Spanish, Chinese, Hindi, Arabic, Vietnamese and another language voted on by individuals who contributed to their Kickstarter campaign. Each fable will have both the written text and audio of native speakers performing it, so that users will be able to match the words with the pronunciation.

Maye was excited to report that they were close to meeting their goal of $3,500 on Kickstarter, and they actually ended up surpassing it. The app will be free, and the funds they raised will enable them to hire people who speak the languages that Maya and her parents don’t. She is bilingual in French and English, her mother is French, and her father speaks both French and Vietnamese. Since Charlottesville is a university town with a larger international population than one might expect, Maya and her mother were fairly optimistic about finding representatives of the other languages they want to include.

When I asked Maya about her interest in languages, she told me that she loves learning about different cultures and sees language as a great point of entry. As a former foreign language teacher myself, I know exactly what she means.

You can learn more about Maya’s app, as well as an app that her mother’s students created, here.

Downtown Mall in Charlottesville, VA

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